Morphology Continued

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Morphology Continued

Postby Miatato » Sat Mar 20, 2010 2:53 pm

From the previous forum, the original post by PeteBleackley:

I've had an idea for a templatic morphology hanging around for a while, and I wondered whether it might be suitable for this collaboration.
Sullable structure is CV(V)(n). A CV, V, and n each count as a mora
A root contains 3 moras, so can be of the form

CVCVCV
CVVCV
CVCVV
CVnCV
CVCVn
CVVn

A morphological process binds to a specific mora within a word, which may be first, second, third, last, penultimate, or antepenultimate. The process may give rise to a number of different allomorphs, depending on whether the mora it binds to is CV, V, or n, and the mora's surrounding environment.



And some hypothetical samples:

kuŋku (n) speech

singular plural
nominative kuŋku kukuŋku
accusative kunaŋku kukunaŋku
genitive kiuŋku kukiuŋku
secundative kuaŋku kukuaŋku

kuniku (n) word

nominative kuniku kukuniku
accusative kunniku kukunniku
genitive kiuniku kukiuniku
secundative kuaniku kukuaniku

kuŋkusi (v) speak
active kuŋkusi
passive kuŋkuesi


I think we can continue the discussion from there.
On a personal note, I like this idea better now that I see how it works, I think.
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Re: Morphology Continued

Postby Uh-Oh » Sat Mar 20, 2010 8:58 pm

I'm still not clear on it.

1) Is ku a pluralising prefix? Or partial reduplication?

2) Does this morphology rule out all syllable-boundary consonant clusters except "nC"; for example, tosma and katsoi couldn't occur?

3) If we wanted to adapt a word like "elephant", it couldn't be elefant or elefante, could it? It would have too many moras. To say nothing of a word like "molybdenum" or "protactinium". Or am I misunderstanding?
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Re: Morphology Continued

Postby kadani » Sat Mar 20, 2010 9:34 pm

1) I think this one was just supposed to give an example so it could be either.

2) pretty much so, though we could have other codas which also form a mora, I guess.

3) We could still have words with more mora, the examples just used three ones.
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Re: Morphology Continued

Postby PeteBleackley » Mon Mar 22, 2010 4:59 am

OK, here's another example

zavusa (bee)

Singular Plural
Nom zavusa zazavusa
Acc zamvusa zazamvusa
Gen ziavusa zaziavusa
Sec zaavusa zazaavusa

So, I was intended the plural marker to be reduplication of the first mora, and the syllable final n to assimilate to the following consonant.

The trimoraic structure applies to native roots, so derived words or load words can be longer, eg zaviuvusa (honey)
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Re: Morphology Continued

Postby Uh-Oh » Tue Mar 23, 2010 11:19 am

PeteBleackley wrote:OK, here's another example

zavusa (bee)

Singular Plural
Nom zavusa zazavusa
Acc zamvusa zazamvusa
Gen ziavusa zaziavusa
Sec zaavusa zazaavusa

So, I was intended the plural marker to be reduplication of the first mora, and the syllable final n to assimilate to the following consonant.

The trimoraic structure applies to native roots, so derived words or load words can be longer, eg zaviuvusa (honey)


1. In the Genitive, doesn't inserting "i" in the middle of the mora "za" break the rules?

2. This approach is clever, interesting, and produces pretty and varied words. But it's at odds with the tendency expressed on the board to pursue something more creole-ish and therefore more isolating. Which way would we like to go?

3. The general concept aside, I'm not a fan of reduplication for pluralising, since it requires on-the-fly analysis of a word in order to build its plural. It's true that all the other morphological processes (to build other cases, for example) do too, but at least the morphemes to be affixed/infixed are consistent.
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Re: Morphology Continued

Postby Miatato » Sat Mar 27, 2010 3:19 pm

I would really like to see this system in use in a few sentences. I am really interested in how it would work in its natural habitat, so to speak. I am not sure that I understand the paradigm well enough to produce my own examples, though I did make an effort in the infixing example on the grammar thread, even though not all the words comformed to the 3-mora system (unless kiti is /ki:ti/?).

Given:
heten: teacher
laasi: story
kiti: to read
tenkai:person
How would you say now that the person reads the story of the teacher?

Tenkai kiti lamasi hieten.
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