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Re: Sentences About The Book.

PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 3:06 pm
by Zwangzug
In Spanish, there's a different form of "to be" used for permanent and temporary conditions; you'd use a different verb to say "the book is red" and "I am tired". Could we use the "to be upon" construction for temporary conditions, and a different construction for inherent traits?

Re: Sentences About The Book.

PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2010 12:14 pm
by Miatato
Zwangzug wrote:In Spanish, there's a different form of "to be" used for permanent and temporary conditions; you'd use a different verb to say "the book is red" and "I am tired". Could we use the "to be upon" construction for temporary conditions, and a different construction for inherent traits?

kadani wrote:I think there are adjectives where the metaphor might break. While it IMHO seems appropriate for anything living, it just feels bad to say that red is upon the book (nenvil zongas kuida). So we can maybe find a use for both constructions.


I am the great thread necromancer! Fear me!

Maybe "to be upon" is for temporary physical or mental conditions. Perhaps more permanent states are expressed with verbs, along the lines of "the book reds" (or "is-red", as I'd normally render it for a literal gloss).

Re: Sentences About The Book.

PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2010 7:36 pm
by alexfink
Miatato wrote:Maybe "to be upon" is for temporary physical or mental conditions. Perhaps more permanent states are expressed with verbs, along the lines of "the book reds" (or "is-red", as I'd normally render it for a literal gloss).


Hm, so then three basic syntactic constructions for adjectives? These two for predicative function, and simple modification (head-first?) for attributive. Could work well. Would there be an attributive variant of the temporary-states construction?

And mildly offtopic, I'd like "to be upon" to be simple zong. Zongas was a repair of Larry's zongs with the -s that marked every finite verb -- but we don't seem to be doing that anymore...